“Good timber does not grow with ease: The stronger wind, the stronger trees;”-Malloch




During the summer whilst at work, I met a man near Breidden Hill, Montgomeryshire who could trace his family history back to the building of Admiral Rodney's naval fleet in the 1780's. He told me how his family had always been involved in and around the Severn. He explained the significance of Rodney's Pillar and why the area was so important to the 18th century Naval fleet. The bit that has come full circle for me is that Admiral Rodney had requested Welsh Oak be used for his boats. The trees were cut and floated down the Severn to Bristol. Welsh Oak was so valuable because it grew in difficult conditions, making the wood slower growing, the grain more dense and therefore more resistant to canonballs. Just after Christmas. a picture caught my eye on Twitter ( from @mands22) with a quote from Douglas Malloch on the inside of a jar lid. That quote is the title for this post. In my mind it is a human description of Rodney's requirement for growth in hard conditions. Douglas Malloch was also known as a
During the summer whilst at work, I met a man near Breidden Hill, Montgomeryshire who could trace his family history back to the building of Admiral Rodney’s naval fleet in the 1780’s. He told me how his family had always been involved in and around the Severn. He explained the significance of Rodney’s Pillar and why the area was so important to the 18th century Naval fleet. The bit that has come full circle for me is that Admiral Rodney had requested Welsh Oak be used for his boats. The trees were cut and floated down the Severn to Bristol. Welsh Oak was so valuable because it grew in difficult conditions, making the wood slower growing, the grain more dense and therefore more resistant to canonballs. Just after Christmas. a picture caught my eye on Twitter ( from @mands22) with a quote from Douglas Malloch on the inside of a jar lid. That quote is the title for this post. In my mind it is a human description of Rodney’s requirement for growth in hard conditions. Douglas Malloch was also known as a “Lumberman’s poet”. Now I’m no literary buff, but I do like the simplicity of his words. So, rather than ramble on about New Years resolutions, I thought I’d share a couple of his poems. Have a great 2013! Good Timber The tree that never had to fight For sun and sky and air and light, But stood out in the open plain And always got its share of rain, Never became a forest king But lived and died a scrubby thing. The man who never had to toil To gain and farm his patch of soil, Who never had to win his share Of sun and sky and light and air, Never became a manly man But lived and died as he began. Good timber does not grow with ease: The stronger wind, the stronger trees; The further sky, the greater length; The more the storm, the more the strength. By sun and cold, by rain and snow, In trees and men good timbers grow. Where thickest lies the forest growth, We find the patriarchs of both. And they hold counsel with the stars Whose broken branches show the scars Of many winds and much of strife. This is the common law of life.   Be the Best of Whatever You Are If you can’t be a pine on the top of the hill, Be a scrub in the valley — but be The best little scrub by the side of the rill; Be a bush if you can’t be a tree. If you can’t be a bush be a bit of the grass, And some highway happier make; If you can’t be a muskie then just be a bass But the liveliest bass in the lake! We can’t all be captains, we’ve got to be crew, There’s something for all of us here, There’s big work to do, and there’s lesser to do, And the task you must do is the near. If you can’t be a highway then just be a trail, If you can’t be the sun be a star; It isn’t by size that you win or you fail Be the best of whatever you are! Douglas Malloch (May 5, 1877 (Muskegon, Michigan) – July 2, 1938)   




3 Replies to ““Good timber does not grow with ease: The stronger wind, the stronger trees;”-Malloch”

  1. This is a poem I read in the Book Mountains for Trailways and Youths, I read this poem to my Son very often from the age of 7-9yrs old, I then wrote it and gave it to him just when he was leaving home to go to Japan for.. " ONE SCHOOL YEAR " :-)))) ) ….. :-((((((( . aaand Yes it was indeed Bitter Sweet memories of both Myself and Him too .. This is indeed a part of my living Bible for it tells us about the true journey of life itself..

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